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Posts tagged ‘integrated writing’

iPads in the Classroom – A Student’s Perspective

TOEFL Writing task – Read a student’s interview on the use of i-pads in the classroom. List two benefits or two setbacks the project brings and state which jeopardizes the learning more. Give examples to justify your answer.

teachingwithipad.org

I had the opportunity to interview a Freshman student, Nick Boone (@2050TGOD) that I coincidentally met on Twitter. He saw a conversation that I was having with a popular YouTube personality, and gave his opinion on iPads in the classroom. I took this chance to contact him and ask if he would answer a few questions. He almost immediately agreed to the interview, which we completed via Google Docs just a matter of a couple hours. Nick had the opportunity to participate in a 1:1 iPad program at his high school…

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Perpetuating Stereotypes

 

This is an integrated writing task based on the video showing part of a Russel Peters’ presentation.

 

https://storify.com/defstef98/perpetuating-stereotypes

 

 Write your answer in no more than 200 words.

Link

A take on how to write effectitvely on the Web

Does this apply to TOEFL-iBT reading texts?

 

Content and Usability

 

Integrated Writing – Protecting children

Read the article on this blog about ways parentes can protect their kids

http://www.childalert.co.uk/article.php?articles_id=124

Watch the video on what parents should allow children to do:

http://www.ted.com/talks/gever_tulley_on_5_dangerous_things_for_kids.html

Summarize the points raised in the video and say how the speaker’s position contrasts with that held by the author.

Time: 20 minutes

Length = 200 words minimum

Integrated Writing – For or Against Gun Control in America

In the wake of the Aurora shooting, the perennial discussion on the individual right or non-right to guns in the U.S. once again comes to the fore. Read the following text on the topic:

I have a dream to counter the nightmare of Aurora. I see three or four ex-presidents standing together, speaking truth to the American people. Here is what they would say:

“Our fellow Americans, we have come together not as Democrats or Republicans, but as men who have been privileged to lead this great country. We all treasure the constitution and the Second Amendment. We believe that Americans have the right to own guns. But that amendment does not entitle citizens to own combat weapons like the assault weapon that the Aurora shooter used to kill 12 and wound 58 more in a Colorado theater. The AR-15 assault rifle is a military-style weapon designed to feature high-capacity ammunition magazines capable of firing up to 30 rounds of ammunition without reloading. You don’t need an assault weapon to protect your family or shoot a deer. No one should own an assault rifle except our folks in the military and the law enforcement officers who protect us. For 10 years, assault weapons like these were banned in all 50 states until Congress let the Federal Assault Weapons Ban “sunset.”

“Our fellow Americans, it’s time to reinstate this law. We call upon the men who lead, or want to lead this country, and the Congress, to do the right thing: protect American citizens by restricting the sale of such weapons to those who have been authorized to use them.”

Is such a group presidential statement a pipedream?

Former President Jimmy Carter has long called for reinstating the assault weapons ban. So, too, did President Clinton. In 1994 Clinton signed two bills that became the hallmark of such efforts. The Brady Handgun Violence Protection Act required a five-day waiting period and background check for the sale of handguns and created a National Instant Criminal Background Check System. The Assault Weapons bill he signed banned the production and importing of 19 types of military-style semiautomatic assault weapons and other guns with similar features, as well as ammunition magazines containing more than 10 rounds.

President George H.W. Bush signed an executive order making it illegal to import Uzis and AK-47s. Even his son, President George W. Bush, whose opposition to gun control may have helped him eke out victory over Al Gore, indicated in 2004 that he would have signed an assault weapons ban reauthorization had Congress approved it.

If not now, when? How many more massacres must Americans endure –the assassination of John F. Kennedy, Columbine, Amish girls, Virginia Tech, Fort Hood, Gabby Giffords? Can’t we do more than pray for families of victims and carry flowers to their graves? 

For the full article, go here.

Now watch the following video in which the speaker seeks to answer a very simple question: Do American Citizens have the right to own a gun?

The task: State how the reading passage contrasts with the views presented in the video. Give examples and reasons presented in each. Write at least 200 words.  

Integrated Writing task – Success

Read the text below about the what it takes to being successful:

That’s right. The whole “nice guys finish last” thing is dead wrong. Organizations are far more effective when people are nice to each other. Nice wins.

Now, anyone who knows me has got to be cracking up right about now because, like I said, I’m not a very nice person. But lately, I’ve been advising some friends on their career strategy. One woman, a friend of my wife’s, is so smart, open, and downright nice, I don’t think she has a clue what a pleasure she is to work with. I’d do anything for her. That’s just how nice she is.

Mind you, I’ve helped loads of friends and associates get jobs, and while I’m sure they’re appreciative, some of them just aren’t that nice about it. Years ago I hooked up one guy with a company I used to work for that was looking for a CEO. He got the job, the company went public, and he made a bundle. I don’t think he ever thanked me.

But my wife’s friend is so not like that. In fact, she’s been at one company for so long that she really wasn’t up on how competitive the job market has become and how sophisticated and cut-throat job seekers are these days. And it occurred to me that, once she gets to a live human being, she’s got a real competitive advantage. As I told her, “Just be yourself, be genuine, be nice, and people will respond in kind. Things will work out fine for you.”

How do I know that if I’m such a jerk? Well, when I want something, I can be really, really nice. And it comes across as genuine because I genuinely really, really want that thing and, if I have to be nice to get it, then I’ll be as nice as I have to be. And you know what? Nine times out of ten, it works. That’s because people are suckers for nice. Here’s why:

First of all, it’s human nature. I mean, if somebody’s staring you right in the face, they really need your help, and they seem really nice, you’d have to be some kind of antisocial creep not to help them. And while email and phones aren’t quite as personal, again, once you’ve made some sort of personal appeal or connection and you’re nice and transparent about it, most people will help if they can.

Lastly, people have a natural tendency to personalize everything, especially things with emotional content. We just imagine ourselves in the other person’s position, the shoe being on the other foot, as it were, and we react the way we’d want them to react to us. Deep down, that’s actually an egocentric or selfish tendency, but in this case, it actually comes across as a nice gesture. Whatever works, right?

The moral of the story is both simple and powerful. I don’t care if you’re an administrative assistant or a CEO, an engineer or a salesperson, in HR or in IT. No man or woman is an island. Organizations are matrices of teams and stakeholders. And they’re far more effective at getting things done when people help each other and are nice to each other.

Taken from the article printed here

 

Now watch the video in which the presenter describes eight secrets to success:

 

How do the ideas in the text contrast with those presented in the video?

Which of the tips presented in your view is the most efficient?

 

Integrated Writing – School systems

According to educator Sir Ken Robinson, there isn’t an education system on the planet that teaches dance the same way to children we teach them mathematics.

Do you think Arts (music, dance, painting etc.) should enjoy the same status as Sciences or Maths? Give reasons and examples to support your answer.